The Last Black Man in San Francisco

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For me there are so many reason why I love film, but the main reason is because of the different feelings they produce in me. While I may dislike a few, others entertain me, but it’s the ones that stir specific emotions that stay with me. Walking into The Last Black Man in San Francisco I got the feeling that this was going to be one of those movies, and move me it did.

Jimmie Fails (Jimmie Fails) and Montgomery Allen (Jonathan Majors) are two men who live in San Francisco and who are both waiting for something. Jimmie likes to stop by his family’s old house and take care of it since the new owners don’t seem to. While he is doing that Montgomery is usually playing the part of look out while he draws and tries and finish the play he is writing. Luck comes Jimmie’s way in the form of the owners of the house having a dispute and having to move out. Once they are out Jimmie and Montgomery move in and make the house their own, doing whatever they want. Good times don’t always stay and soon the dispute leads to the house being put up for sale. Believing that his grandfather built that house with his own two hands, Jimmie tries to do all he can to keep it, but just can’t come through. Given a week to stay at the house before he vacates, it’s the inspiration that finally puts the finishing touches on Montgomery’s play. It is on that final night in the house that the play is performed with a story that will set Jimmie free once and for all.

There are times when you see a movie that make you believe that it would have a place among the prize pieces of art, it sparks that kind of feelings. I know that may sound crazy to say, but cinema at its greatest are works of art. The Last Black Man in San Francisco is one of those moves and it doesn’t take you long to realize that. Written by Rob Richert and Joe Talbot, the later also directing tell a story about love between friends and the love of a city. Talbot captures San Francisco unlike anyone has before and shows you a side of it that will leave a mark on you. This movie’s beauty doesn’t just lie in what you see with your eyes, but in what you will feel in your heart, because it ables to make even the darkest of souls have a light shine on it. This movie is about home and finding your place and is easily going to end up on my best of the year list, as is does what all great cinema can, pull you in and remain with you long after the credits roll.

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